Podcast Episode 107: Arthur Nash and the Golden Rule

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Arthur_Nash,_formal_sitting,_circa_1927.jpg

In 1919, Ohio businessman Arthur Nash decided to run his clothing factory according to the Golden Rule and treat his workers the way he’d want to be treated himself. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll visit Nash’s “Golden Rule Factory” and learn the results of his innovative social experiment.

We’ll also marvel at metabolism and puzzle over the secrets of Chicago pickpockets.

Sources for our feature on Arthur Nash:

Arthur Nash, The Golden Rule in Business, 1923.

(Undercover journalist Ruth White Colton’s September 1922 article for Success Magazine is quoted in full in this book.)

Jeffrey Wattles, The Golden Rule, 1996.

Arthur Nash, “A Bible Text That Worked a Business Miracle,” American Magazine 92:4 (October 1921), 37.

“Golden Rule Plan at Clothing Mill Makes Profits for Owners,” Deseret News, Dec. 16, 1920.

“Golden Rule Nash Offers 7-Hour Day,” Schenectady Gazette, July 4, 1923.

“Arthur Nash, Who Shared With Employees, Is Dead,” Associated Press, Oct. 31, 1927.

The poem “Miss T.” appears in Walter de la Mare’s 1913 collection Peacock Pie:

It’s a very odd thing —
As odd as can be —
That whatever Miss T. eats
Turns into Miss T.;
Porridge and apples,
Mince, muffins and mutton,
Jam, junket, jumbles —
Not a rap, not a button
It matters; the moment
They’re out of her plate,
Though shared by Miss Butcher
And sour Mr. Bate;
Tiny and cheerful,
And neat as can be,
Whatever Miss T. eats
Turns into Miss T.

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle is taken from Henry O. Wills’ memorably titled 1890 autobiography Twice Born: Or, The Two Lives of Henry O. Wills, Evangelist (Being a Narrative of Mr. Wills’s Remarkable Experiences as a Wharf-Rat, a Sneak-Thief, a Convict, a Soldier, a Bounty-Jumper, a Fakir, a Fireman, a Ward-Heeler, and a Plug-Ugly. Also, a History of His Most Wondrous Conversion to God, and of His Famous Achievements as an Evangelist).

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or Google Play Music or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the support page of the Futility Closet website.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 106: The Popgun War

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USArmy_M114_howitzer.jpg

During wargames in Louisiana in September 1941, the U.S. Army found itself drawn into a tense firefight with an unseen enemy across the Cane River. The attacker turned out to be three boys with a toy cannon. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll revisit the Battle of Bermuda Bridge and the Prudhomme brothers’ account of their historic engagement.

We’ll also rhapsodize on guinea pigs and puzzle over some praiseworthy incompetence.

Sources for our feature on the “Battle of Bermuda Bridge”:

Elizabeth M. Collins, “Patton ‘Bested’ at the Battle of Bermuda Bridge,” Soldiers 64:9 (September 2009), 10-12.

Terry Isbell, “The Battle of the Bayous: The Louisiana Maneuvers,” Old Natchitoches Parish Magazine 2 (1997), 2-7.

Special thanks to the staff at the University of North Carolina’s Wilson Library for access to the Prudhomme family records.

Listener mail:

Alastair Bland, “From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs,” The Salt, National Public Radio, April 2, 2013.

Christine Dell’Amore, “Guinea Pigs Were Widespread as Elizabethan Pets,” National Geographic, Feb. 9, 2012.

Wikipedia, “Guinea Pig” (accessed May 20, 2016).

David Adam, “Why Use Guinea Pigs in Animal Testing?”, Guardian, Aug. 25, 2005.

Maev Kennedy, “Elizabethan Portraits Offer Snapshot of Fashion for Exotic Pets,” Guardian, Aug. 20, 2013.

“How Did the Guinea Pig Get Its Name?”, Grammarphobia, Dec. 22, 2009.

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Tommy Honton, who sent these corroborating links (warning: these spoil the puzzle).

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or Google Play Music or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Enter code CLOSET to get $5 off your first purchase of high-quality razor blades at Harry’s.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 105: Surviving on Seawater

alain bombard

In 1952, French physician Alain Bombard set out to cross the Atlantic on an inflatable raft to prove his theory that a shipwreck victim can stay alive on a diet of seawater, fish, and plankton. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll set out with Bombard on his perilous attempt to test his theory.

We’ll also admire some wobbly pedestrians and puzzle over a luckless burglar.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for our feature on Alain Bombard:

Alain Bombard, The Voyage of the Hérétique, 1953.

William H. Allen, “Thirst,” Natural History, December 1956.

Richard T. Callaghan, “Drift Voyages Across the Mid-Atlantic,” Antiquity 89:345 (2015), 724-731.

T.C. Macdonald, “Drinking Sea-Water,” British Medical Journal 1:4869 (May 1, 1954), 1035.

Dominique Andre, “Sea Fever,” Unesco Courier, July/August 1998.

N.B. Marshall, “Review: The Voyage of L’hérétique,” Geographical Journal 120:1 (March 1954), 83-87.

Douglas Martin, “Alain Bombard, 80, Dies; Sailed the Atlantic Alone,” New York Times, July 24, 2005.

Anthony Smith, “Obituary: Alain Bombard,” Guardian, Aug. 24, 2005.

John Scott Hughes, “Deep Sea in Little Ships,” The Field, May 27, 1954.

“Will This Be Another ‘Kon Tiki’?” The Sphere, June 7, 1952.

“Mishap And Survival At Sea,” The Sphere, April 2, 1955.

Bryan Kasmenn, “Teach a Man to Fish …,” Flying Safety 57:5 (May 2001), 20.

Listener mail:

National Public Radio, “In The 1870s And ’80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But,” April 3, 2014.

Wikipedia, “Edward Payson Weston” (accessed May 7, 2016).

Wikipedia, “6 Day Race” (accessed May 7, 2016).

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was adapted from the book Lateral Mindtrap Puzzles (2000). Here’s a corroborating link (warning — this spoils the puzzle).

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or Google Play Music or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 104: The Harvey’s Casino Bombing

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Harveys_bombing.jpg

In August 1980, an extortionist planted a thousand-pound bomb in Harvey’s Wagon Wheel Casino in western Nevada. Unless the owners paid him $3 million within 24 hours, he said, the bomb would go off and destroy the casino. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll describe the tense drama that followed and the FBI’s efforts to catch the criminal behind it.

We’ll also consider some dubious lawn care shortcuts and puzzle over why a man would tear up a winning ticket.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for our feature on the Harvey’s bombing:

Jim Sloan, Render Safe: The Untold Story of the Harvey’s Bombing, 2011.

Adam Higginbotham, “1,000 Pounds of Dynamite,” The Atavist 39.

“5 Charged in Harveys Bombing,” Associated Press, Aug. 17, 1981.

“Five Suspects Arrested in Harvey’s Extortion Bombing,” Associated Press, Aug. 17, 1981.

“Son Pitted Against Father in Harvey’s Bombing Trial,” Associated Press, Oct. 17, 1982.

Robert Macy, “Ex-Freedom Fighter Found Guilty of Bombing Hotel,” Telegraph, Oct. 23, 1982.

Melinda Beck, “A Real Harvey’s Wallbanger,” Newsweek, Sept. 8, 1980.

Phillip L. Sublett, “30 Years Later: Trail of Clues Led Authorities to Harvey’s Casino Bombers,” Tahoe Daily Tribune, Aug. 28, 2010.

Guy Clifton, “35 Years Ago Today: The Bomb That Shook Lake Tahoe,” Reno Gazette-Journal, Aug. 26, 2015.

A brief FBI article about the case.

Full text of the extortion note.

Video discussion of the case by retired FBI special agent Chris Ronay (transcript):

Listener mail:

The imgur gallery with the German saboteur cache is here — click the link “Load remaining 44 images” just above the comments to see the photo we mentioned.

The book quoted by Stephanie Guertin is Weapons of the Navy SEALs, by Kevin Dockery, 2004.

Video of workers spray-painting the ground in preparation for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

Malcolm Moore, “China Officials Caught Spray-Painting Grass Green in Chengdu,” Telegraph, March 4, 2013.

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Matt Sargent.

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or Google Play Music or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 103: Legislating Pi

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Detroit_Photographic_Company_(0340).jpg

In 1897, confused physician Edward J. Goodwin submitted a bill to the Indiana General Assembly declaring that he’d squared the circle — a mathematical feat that was known to be impossible. In today’s show we’ll examine the Indiana pi bill, its colorful and eccentric sponsor, and its celebrated course through a bewildered legislature and into mathematical history.

We’ll also marvel at the confusion wrought by turkeys and puzzle over a perplexing baseball game.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for our feature on the Indiana pi bill:

Edward J. Goodwin, “Quadrature of the Circle,” American Mathematical Monthly 1:7 (July 1894), 246–248.

Text of the bill.

Underwood Dudley, “Legislating Pi,” Math Horizons 6:3 (February 1999), 10-13.

Will E. Edington, “House Bill No. 246, Indiana State Legislature, 1897,” Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science 45, 206-210.

Arthur E. Hallerberg, “House Bill No. 246 Revisited,” Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science 84 (1974), 374–399.

Arthur E. Hallerberg, “Indiana’s Squared Circle,” Mathematics Magazine 50:3 (May 1977), 136–140.

David Singmaster, “The Legal Values of Pi,” Mathematical Intelligencer 7:2 (1985), 69–72.

Listener mail:

Zach Goldhammer, “Why Americans Call Turkey ‘Turkey,'” Atlantic, Nov. 26, 2014.

Dan Jurafsky, “Turkey,” The Language of Food, Nov. 23, 2010 (accessed April 21, 2016).

Accidental acrostics from Julian Bravo:

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn:
STASIS starts at line 7261 (“Says I to myself” in Chapter XXVI).

Frankenstein:
CASSIA starts at line 443 (“Certainly; it would indeed be very impertinent” in Letter 4).
MIGHTY starts at line 7089 (“Margaret, what comment can I make” in Chapter 24).

Moby Dick:
BAIT starts at line 12904 (“But as you come nearer to this great head” in Chapter 75). (Note that this includes a footnote.)

The raw output of Julian’s program is here; he warns that it may contain some false positives.

At the paragraph level (that is, the initial letters of successive paragraphs), Daniel Dunn found these acrostics (numbers refer to paragraphs):

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: SEMEMES (1110)

Emma: INHIBIT (2337)

King James Bible: TAIWAN (12186)

Huckleberry Finn: STASIS (1477)

Critique of Pure Reason: SWIFTS (863)

Anna Karenina: TWIST (3355)

At the word level (the initial letters of successive words), Daniel found these (numbers refer to the position in a book’s overall word count — I’ve included links to the two I mentioned on the show):

Les Miserables: DASHPOTS (454934)

Critique of Pure Reason: TRADITOR (103485)

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: ISATINES (373818)

Through the Looking Glass: ASTASIAS (3736)

War and Peace: PIRANHAS (507464) (Book Fifteen, Chapter 1, paragraph 19: “‘… put it right.’ And now he again seemed …”)

King James Bible: MOHAMAD (747496) (Galatians 6:11b-12a, “… mine own hand. As many as desire …”)

The Great Gatsby: ISLAMIC (5712)

Huckleberry Finn: ALFALFA (62782)

Little Women: CATFISH (20624)

From Vadas Gintautas: Here is the complete list of accidental acrostics of English words of 8 letters or more, found by taking the first letter in successive paragraphs:

TABITHAS in George Sand: Some Aspects of Her Life and Writings by René Doumic

BASSISTS in The Pilot and his Wife by Jonas Lie

ATACAMAS in Minor Poems of Michael Drayton

MAINTAIN in The Stamps of Canada by Bertram W.H. Poole

BATHMATS in Fifty Years of Public Service by Shelby M. Cullom

ASSESSES in An Alphabetical List of Books Contained in Bohn’s Libraries

LATTICES in History of the Buccaneers of America by James Burney

ASSESSES in Old English Chronicles by J.A. Giles

BASSISTS in Tales from the X-bar Horse Camp: The Blue-Roan “Outlaw” and Other Stories by Barnes

CATACOMB in Cyrano De Bergerac

PONTIANAK in English Economic History: Select Documents by Brown, Tawney, and Bland

STATIONS in Haunted Places in England by Elliott O’Donnell

TRISTANS in Revolutionary Reader by Sophie Lee Foster

ALLIANCE in Latter-Day Sweethearts by Mrs. Burton Harrison

TAHITIAN in Lothair by Benjamin Disraeli

Vadas’ full list of accidental acrostics in the King James Bible (first letter of each verse) for words of at least five letters:

ASAMA in The Second Book of the Kings 16:21
TRAIL in The Book of Psalms 80:13
AMATI in The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel 3:9
STABS in The Acts of the Apostles 23:18
ATTAR in The Book of Nehemiah 13:10
FLOSS in The Gospel According to Saint Luke 14:28
SANTA in The First Book of the Chronicles 16:37
WATTS in Hosea 7:13
BAATH in The Acts of the Apostles 15:38
ASSAM in The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel 12:8
CHAFF in The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Romans 4:9
FIFTH in The Book of Psalms 61:3
SAABS in The Third Book of the Kings 12:19
SATAN in The Book of Esther 8:14
TANGS in Zephaniah 1:15
STOAT in The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah 16:20
IGLOO in The Proverbs 31:4
TEETH in Hosea 11:11
RAILS in The Book of Psalms 80:14
STATS in The First Book of the Kings 26:7
HALON in The Fourth Book of the Kings 19:12
TATTY in The Gospel According to Saint John 7:30
DIANA in The Second Book of the Kings 5:4
ABAFT in The Third Book of Moses: Called Leviticus 25:39
BAHIA in The Book of Daniel 7:26
TRAILS in The Book of Psalms 80:13
FIFTHS in The Book of Psalms 61:3
BATAAN in The First Book of Moses: Called Genesis 25:6
DIANAS in The Second Book of the Kings 5:4
BATAANS in The Second Book of the Chronicles 26:16

Vadas’ full list of accidental acrostics (words of at least eight letters) found by text-wrapping the Project Gutenberg top 100 books (of the last 30 days) to line lengths from 40 to 95 characters (line length / word found):

Ulysses
58 / SCOFFLAW

Great Expectations
75 / HIGHTAIL

Dracula
58 / PONTIACS

Emma
52 / BRAINWASH

War and Peace
43 / MISCASTS

The Romance of Lust: A Classic Victorian Erotic Novel by Anonymous
42 / FEEBLEST
77 / PARAPETS

Steam, Its Generation and Use by Babcock & Wilcox Company
52 / PRACTISE

The Count of Monte Cristo
46 / PLUTARCH

The Republic
57 / STEPSONS

A Study in Scarlet
61 / SHORTISH

The Essays of Montaigne
73 / DISTANCE

Crime and Punishment
49 / THORACES

Complete Works–William Shakespeare
42 / HATCHWAY
58 / RESTARTS
91 / SHEPPARD

The Time Machine
59 / ATHLETIC

Democracy in America, VI
89 / TEARIEST

The King James Bible
41 / ATTACKING
56 / STATUSES
61 / CATBOATS
69 / ASTRAKHAN
85 / SARATOVS

Anna Karenina
46 / TSITSIHAR
74 / TRAILING

David Copperfield
48 / COMPACTS
58 / SABBATHS

Le Morte d’Arthur, Volume I
55 / KAWABATA

Vadas also points out that there’s a body of academic work addressing acrostics in Milton’s writings. For example, in Book 3 of Paradise Lost Satan sits among the stars looking “down with wonder” at the world:

Such wonder seis’d, though after Heaven seen,
The Spirit maligne, but much more envy seis’d
At sight of all this World beheld so faire.
Round he surveys, and well might, where he stood
So high above the circling Canopie
Of Nights extended shade …

The initial letters of successive lines spell out STARS. Whether that’s deliberate is a matter of some interesting debate. Two further articles:

Mark Vaughn, “More Than Meets the Eye: Milton’s Acrostics in Paradise Lost,” Milton Quarterly 16:1 (March 1982), 6–8.

Jane Partner, “Satanic Vision and Acrostics in Paradise Lost,” Essays in Criticism 57:2 (April 2007), 129-146.

And listener Charles Hargrove reminds us of a telling acrostic in California’s recent political history.

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Lawrence Miller, based on a Car Talk Puzzler credited to Willie Myers.

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 102: The Bunion Derby

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kaibabnationalforest/5734775201
Image: Flickr

In 1928, 199 runners set out on a perilous 3,400-mile footrace across America, from Los Angeles to Chicago and on to New York. The winner would receive $25,000 — if anyone finished at all. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll follow the Trans-American Footrace, better known as the Bunion Derby, billed as the greatest footrace the world had ever known.

We’ll also learn some creepy things about spiders and puzzle over why one man needs three cars.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for our feature on the Trans-American Footrace:

Charles B. Kastner, The Bunion Derby, 2007.

“Mr. Pyle’s Professional Bunion Derby,” Pittsburgh Press, April 19, 1928.

“Payne Wins First Prize in Pyle’s Bunion Derby,” Associated Press, May 27, 1928.

“C.C. Pyle Hopes Bunion Derby to Net Him Profit,” Ottawa Citizen, March 29, 1929.

“Sport: Bunion Derby,” Time, June 24, 1929, 58.

“Bunion Derby’ Hero Elected,” Associated Press, Nov. 8, 1934.

“Bunion Derby Director Dies,” Associated Press, Feb. 4, 1939.

“Mapping the Way,” Runner’s World, July 1992, 94.

“Harry Abrams Is Dead at 87; Ran Across the Country Twice,” New York Times, Nov. 28, 1994.

Jack Rockett, “The Great ‘Bunion Derby,'” Runner’s World, Nov. 7, 2006.

Laura Ruttum, “Endurance Racing: First Leg, the Bunion Derby,” New York Public Library, April 2, 2010.

Some footage from the race — winner Andy Payne wears number 43:

Listener mail:

Kiona Smith-Strickland, “This Is How to Find the Spiders That Are Staring At You in the Dark,” Gizmodo, Aug. 2, 2015.

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Patrick Riehl.

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 101: Jerome

jerome

In 1863 the residents of Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia, discovered a legless man on the shore of St. Mary’s Bay. He spoke no English and could not tell them who he was or where he had come from. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll tell the story of “Jerome” and what is known or guessed of his past.

We’ll also learn about explosive rats in World War II and puzzle over a computer that works better when its users sit.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for our feature on Jerome:

Fraser Mooney Jr., Jerome: Solving the Mystery of Nova Scotia’s Silent Castaway, 2008.

“The Mystery of the Man at Meteghan,” St. John Daily Sun, Sept. 8, 1905.

Harriet Hill, “Mystery Fascinates,” Montreal Gazette, June 14, 1963.

Andrea MacDonald, “Legless-Man Mystery Revealed,” Halifax Daily News, Aug. 30, 2006.

Brian Flemming, “Maritime Mysteries Still Enthrall,” Halifax Daily News, Sept. 5, 2006.

Noah Richler, “The Legless Castaway,” Literary Review of Canada, March 1, 2009.

Ian Cameron, “The Frozen Man of Queens County,” Canadian Family Physician, August 2009.

Listener mail:

Wikipedia, “Explosive Rat” (accessed April 9, 2016).

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Jed Link, who sent this corroborating link (warning: this spoils the puzzle).

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 100: Lateral Thinking Puzzles

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mono_pensador.jpg

Here are five new lateral thinking puzzles to test your wits and stump your friends — play along with us as we try to untangle some perplexing situations using yes-or-no questions.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Here are the sources for this week’s puzzles. In a couple of places we’ve included links to further information — these contain spoilers, so don’t click until you’ve listened to the episode:

Hotel: Listener Paul Sophocleous

Train: Listener Sean Gilbertson

Safe (more information): Listener David White

Robber (more information): Sharon Ross

Murder: Paul Sloane and Des MacHale, Intriguing Lateral Thinking Puzzles, 1996

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 99: Notes and Queries

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In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll take a tour through some oddities and unanswered questions from our research, including whether a spider saved Frederick the Great’s life, a statue with the wrong face, and a spectacularly disaster-prone oil tanker.

We’ll also revisit the lost soldiers of World War I and puzzle over some curiously lethal ship cargo.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for this week’s feature:

The story about Frederick the Great is from Ebenezer Cobham Brewer’s The Reader’s Handbook of Famous Names in Fiction, Allusions, References, Proverbs, Plots, Stories, and Poems, 1899.

The footnote about spiders and flashlights accompanies J.D. Memory’s poem “The Eightfold Way, Lie Algebra, and Spider Hunting in the Dark” in Mathematics Magazine 79:1 (February 2006), 74.

The case of the self-abnegating heir is cited as Beamish v. Beamish, 9 H.L.C. 274, 11 Eng. Rep. 735 (1861) in Peter Suber’s 1990 book The Paradox of Self-Amendment.

John Waterhouse’s 1899 proof of the Pythagorean theorem appears in Elisha Scott Loomis’ 1940 book The Pythagorean Proposition. My notes say it’s also in Scientific American, volume 82, page 356.

The story of the ill-starred oil tanker Argo Merchant is taken from Stephen Pile’s 1979 Book of Heroic Failures. For an exceptionally well-reported history of the ship, see Ron Winslow’s 1978 book Hard Aground.

Physicist Leonard Mlodinow recounts the story of Antoine Lavoisier’s statue in The Upright Thinkers (2015). A contemporary description of the unveiling is here, but it mentions nothing amiss.

Ross Eckler addresses accidental acrostics in Making the Alphabet Dance, 1997.

F.R. Benson’s iambic ponging is mentioned in Jonathan Law, ed., Methuen Drama Dictionary of the Theatre, 2013.

William Kendal’s accomplished blanching is described in Eric Johns’ Dames of the Theatre, 1975.

In The Book of the Harp (2005), John Marson notes that Luigi Ferrari Trecate’s Improvviso da Concerto (1947), for the left hand, is dedicated to harpist Aida Ferretti Orsini, described as grande mutilata di guerre.

Mable LaRose’s 1897 auction is recounted in Pierre Berton’s The Klondike Fever, 2003, and Douglas Fetherling’s The Gold Crusades, 1997.

Listener mail:

Here’s the scene in which the dead of World War I arise in Abel Gance’s 1919 feature J’Accuse:

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Price Tipping.

You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on iTunes or via the RSS feed at http://feedpress.me/futilitycloset.

Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

Enter promo code CLOSET at Harry’s and get $5 off your first order of high-quality razors.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Podcast Episode 98: The St. Albans Raid

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:St_Albans_Raiders.gif

Seemingly safe in northern New England, the residents of St. Albans, Vermont, were astonished in October 1864 when a group of Confederate soldiers appeared in their midst, terrorizing residents, robbing banks, and stealing horses. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll tell the story of the St. Albans raid, the northernmost land action of the Civil War.

We’ll also learn about Charles Darwin’s misadventures at the equator and puzzle over a groundskeeper’s strange method of tending grass.

Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet — on our Patreon page you can pledge any amount per episode, and all contributions are greatly appreciated. You can change or cancel your pledge at any time, and we’ve set up some rewards to help thank you for your support.

You can also make a one-time donation via the Donate button in the sidebar of the Futility Closet website.

Sources for our feature on the St. Albans raid:

Dennis K. Wilson, Justice Under Pressure: The Saint Albans Raid and Its Aftermath, 1992.

Robin W. Winks, The Civil War Years: Canada and the United States, 1998.

Stuart Lutz, “Terror in St. Albans,” Civil War Times Illustrated 40:3 (June 2001).

Rick Beard, “When the Rebels Invaded Vermont,” New York Times, Oct. 17, 2014.

“A Reminiscence of the St. Albans Raid,” Montreal Daily Witness, April 5, 1878.

“Confederate Raid on St. Albans, Vt.,” Pittsburgh Gazette Times, Oct 21, 1914.

“Leader of Raid on St. Albans, Vermont, Centre of Controversy at Champlain Celebration,” Boston Evening Transcript, May 9, 1912.

Edgar Andrew Collard, “Of Many Things …,” Montreal Gazette, March 28, 1969.

“English View of the St. Albans Raid Case,” Halifax Morning Chronicle, Jan. 24, 1865.

Listener mail:

Wikipedia, “Line-Crossing Ceremony” (accessed March 18, 2016).

R.D. Keynes, ed., Charles Darwin’s Beagle Diary, 2001.

Jacqueline Klimas, “Navy Leaders Try to Stamp Out Hazing, But Many Sailors Question the Rules,” Military Times, July 2, 2013.

Wikipedia, “Plimsoll Shoe” (accessed March 18, 2016).

This week’s lateral thinking puzzle is from Paul Sloane and Des MacHale’s 1998 book Ingenious Lateral Thinking Puzzles.

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Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode.

If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!