Unquote

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:4_The_Scientists.JPG

“It is well to read everything of something and something of everything.” — Henry Brougham

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” — Inscribed on Thomas Huxley’s memorial

“The whole secret of life is to be interested in one thing profoundly and in a thousand things well.” — Horace Walpole

Unquote

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1_device-to-root-out-evil-vancouver-canada.jpg

“Good can imagine Evil, but Evil cannot imagine Good.” — W.H. Auden

“Good men seek it by the natural means of the virtues; evil men, however, try to achieve the same goal by a variety of concupiscences, and that is surely an unnatural way of seeking the good. Don’t you agree?” — Boethius

“For never, never, wicked man was wise.” — Homer

“Men may keep a sort of level of good, but no man has ever been able to keep on one level of evil.” — G.K. Chesterton

American artist Dennis Oppenheim denied that his 1997 Device to Root Out Evil, above, had an anti-religious message. “Pointing a steeple into the ground directs it to hell as opposed to heaven,” he told one interviewer. “It’s a very simple gesture.”

Unquote

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wrath_of_Achilles2.jpg

“It has been said of the Iliad that anyone who starts reading it as history will find that it is full of fiction but, equally, anyone who starts reading it as fiction will find that it is full of history.” — Arnold Toynbee

Unquote

“Sweet is the remembrance of troubles when you are in safety.” — Euripides

“Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility.” — James Thurber

But:

“In every adversity of fortune, to have been happy is the most unhappy kind of misfortune.” — Boethius

Unquote

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Piechowski_Wedding_toast.jpg

“It is most absurdly said, in popular language, of any man, that he is disguised in liquor; for, on the contrary, most men are disguised by sobriety.” — Thomas de Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, 1856